Terry, Just Run A Grassroots Campaign And You Will Win The Primary And The General

One of your opponents is kind of desperate. He is a nice guy, but he has not run a good campaign. He is taking increasingly bad advice from some stunted advisors.

You should continue putting your message out there. I think you are a great candidate. I have told you and your campaign more than once to break down your business career in a digestible manner so it is comprehensible to people. The presentation in your book is rather opaque.

People are concerned about your wealth. This goes back to your business career. Lay it out.

What have you done in the past to show that you are not just an agent for the rich? Show your bonafides to the public or at least to the Democratic base. Address the activist concerns.

Should you worry about the silly people being paid a fair bit of money to pursue a strategy of guilt by association against you? Should you be worried that one of your opponent's campaigns is populated by people who release the personal emails of a respected Virginia activist because he considered working for said opponent but ended up supporting you publicly? Should you be worried that an opponent's "strategist" (oooo tough guy fond of loyal attack dogs, be afraid, very afraid) is employing Harris Miller's '06 Senate primary strategy?

Mr. Miller is a nice man, but not many people know him.

You are the best candidate. You have not run for office before. Do a bit more to introduce yourself and you will win the primary going away.

The advice is good, but the need for it

is emblematic of the real problem of the McAuliffe campaign, which is that he has NO public record upon which to proceed. He's free to invent himself because he's never been in the legislative trenches and has no votes to defend and no public political positions other than those he took as part of a campaign or as leader of the DNC, and he can defend himself with the argument that he was only doing his employer's bidding or playing the part of partisan because it was required of him at the time. His utter lack of experience as an elected official permits him to point to his past and say "I'm not really that guy. I was just playing a role occasioned by my position". I wouldn't call turning $100,000 into $18 million out of a failed business in a few short years a case of "guilt by association", but I guess Terry and his supporters would.

Terry should take your advice and break his entire life down into neat little packages tied up with big glossy bows. Maybe the public will fall for the pretty paper and the nice corners on the packages, but one must wonder how much inside those packages is substance and how much just a tissue cushion.

Are You Supporting The Other Candidate From NOVA?

Help them clean up their own house. It is overrun with rats and all kinds of bad stuff. Some of the people who work there should be out on the street panhandling.

Are you speaking of the Moran campaign?

Your post was a bit cryptic; however, if you are critical of the way the Moran campaign is handling things I would agree, there is plenty to criticize. I don't know why his closest advisers are not arguing his strongest point, which is his extensive legislative and overall Virginia experience versus McAuliffe's recent discovery that he lives in Virginia and is thus eligible to run for the governorship what with having nothing better to do. It's frustrating to see his closest advisers practically ignoring this winning argument on his behalf. I'm not so impressed with the relentless "let's just all be really, really positive" meme of the McAuliffe camp, which seems aimed more at preventing people from looking too closely at what's inside the pretty boxes than about just being nice to everyone. Terry's history belies his sudden, fervent belief in running on positives alone.